"If you’ve never fasted before, be aware that in the early stages you may get dizzy and have headaches. This is part of the body’s cleansing process and will pass with time. Be sure that you break the fast gradually with fresh fruit and vegetables. Do not overeat after the fast. Chili and pizza may sound good after several days of not eating, but please, exercise a little restraint and say no!” – What Christians Need to Know about Fasting by Sam Storms
^ Jump up to: a b c Harris, L; Hamilton, S; Azevedo, LB; Olajide, J; De Brún, C; Waller, G; Whittaker, V; Sharp, T; Lean, M; Hankey, C; Ells, L (February 2018). "Intermittent fasting interventions for treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis". JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports. 16 (2): 507–547. doi:10.11124/JBISRIR-2016-003248. PMID 29419624.
Thanks for your honesty and for sharing why you feel that this attempt was not successful. Why don’t you start the 4 week challenge over again? You see learning how to get the best results does not mean giving up just because on your first attempt it did not work. The biggest battle to losing weight and improving you health is about changing years of habits (both conscious habits and the unconscious habits). That is why your mindset and your commitment to want to lose weight is so important. You must know why you are wanting to lose the weight. What is the real motivation? Is it enough to keep your committed and following through? Also look at the trigger points that caused you to ‘falter’ give up, cave in, quit. This will tell you alot. Perhaps you might be interested in some extra resources. Send me an email if you would like some further help [email protected]
The devil comes at us the same way. The devil never tells us that drinking alcohol can make a person an alcoholic. He never tells a person that smoking cigarettes can cause him or her to have lung cancer. He never tells a person that eating too much of the wrong foods can lead to chronic illness and premature death. The devil points out only short-term benefits, never long-term disasters.

It can level up your brain, including positively counteracting conditions like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and dementia. As explained here in this TEDx talk by Mark Mattson, Professor at Johns Hopkins University and Chief of the Laboratory of Neurosciences at the National Institute on Aging fasting is grounded in serious research and more studies are coming out showing the benefits:

Hey! I've been following this site for a while but I'm so busy that I've never been able to get around to a lot of this. I'm a 17 year old female in high school, and I take college level classes and work a lot after school, so I'm constantly busy between work, homework, and school itself. I also lack willpower a lot, which I think is why I struggle to lose weight so much. With such a busy schedule and such little willpower, what do you think would be the best way for me to lose weight and rather quickly (though healthily)? I'm 5'5 and I weigh 240 pounds.

Second, fasting seems foreign to many of us simply because nobody talks about it that much. The reason for this is that nobody stands to make much money by telling you to not eat their products, not take their supplements, or not buy their goods. In other words, fasting isn't a very marketable topic and so you're not exposed to advertising and marketing on it very often. The result is that it seems somewhat extreme or strange, even though its really not.


Fasts must be entered and exited with care. To enter a fast, the diet should be gradually lightened over a few days. First, heavy foods such as meats and dairy products should be eliminated for a day or two. Grains, nuts, and beans should then be reduced for several days. The day before a fast, only easily digested foods like fruits, light salads, and soups should be eaten. During the fast, only pure water and occasional herbal teas should be drunk.
Along with obligatory prayer, it is one of the greatest obligations of a Bahá'í.[22] In the first half of the 20th century, Shoghi Effendi, explains: "It is essentially a period of meditation and prayer, of spiritual recuperation, during which the believer must strive to make the necessary readjustments in his inner life, and to refresh and reinvigorate the spiritual forces latent in his soul. Its significance and purpose are, therefore, fundamentally spiritual in character. Fasting is symbolic, and a reminder of abstinence from selfish and carnal desires."[23]
×