Even though you are skipping breakfast, it's still important to stay hydrated. Make sure to still drink enough water. You can also have herbal tea. The catechins in tea have been shown to enhance the benefits of fasting by helping to further decrease the hunger hormone ghrelin, so you can make it until lunch and not feel deprived. Since you’ve increased your fasting period an extra four hours, you need to make sure your first meal (at noon) has enough healthy fats. The burger in the 8-to-6 window plan will work well, and you can add more fats in with your dressing or top with an avocado!
Alternate-day fasting. Go back and forth between feasting days and fasting days. Eat like a king or queen one day, then eat nothing the next. This will probably be the most challenging fasting option for most people. If you try it, make sure you’re eating a ton on your feast days, otherwise you’ll fall into a major calorie deficit and you’ll likely feel miserable.

Hi Adrian. I hope all is well with you. I was referred to subscribe to your channel last night and I did. Well, not sure where to start BUT... I have been on my journey with weight loss for a while now and on April 16th of this year I decided to try intermittent fasting. I broke my fast a few times the first week but after that I have been doing well, going to the gym and working out 4-5 days a week doing mostly cardio. From what I've been reading and seeing about IF, people are losing 5-8 lbs a week. Me? I've only lost 4.7 lbs. I am happy for the 4.7lbs down but I was thinking that being the weight that I started (245.4 lbs) would mean I would lose the weight faster. No? I also am watching what I eat via MyFitnessPal to help me count my calories. I usually east between 1200 - 1450 calories. There are days that I have eaten a little less but not much. Also I am 5'1. Please help me because I am discouraged and frustrated doing all I think is right with IF but not seeing the maximum results as people have mentioned. What do you think may be the issue here? Also there is nothing wrong with me medically to say that's the reason I am not losing much weight. I hope to hear from you because I really don't want to give up. I am trying to be healthy! Thank you. (I also sent this message to you on YouTube. Not sure which messages you check more frequently).


Dr. Michael Mosley, the creator of The Fast Diet, believes that fasting can help with weight loss. For Dr. Mosley, the term fasting does not mean abstaining from all food, but rather limiting food intake and adapting simplified eating patterns to help you lose weight. Below are some of Dr. Mosley’s recommendations for a safe fast as well as a few extra Oz-approved tips and tricks.

There may also be other intermittent fasting benefits: A 2017 study from the University of Southern California followed 71 adults who were placed on a low-calorie, fasting-mimicking diet for five days each month for three months. After following the diet, researchers found that the diet reduced cardiovascular risks, including blood pressure, inflammation, and body fat, in participants. A 2018 study from the British Journal of Nutrition backs this up after overweight participants followed the 5:2 method and saw improvements in their triglyceride levels and blood pressure. Other studies have also shown that IF may help with relieving MS symptoms, but more studies are needed on a larger scale and for a longer period of time to support these claims.
The Word of God does not specifically command believers to spend time in prayer and fasting. At the same time, prayer and fasting is definitely something we should be doing. Far too often, though, the focus of prayer and fasting is on abstaining from food. Instead, the purpose of Christian fasting should be to take our eyes off the things of this world and focus our thoughts on God. Fasting should always be limited to a set time because not eating for extended periods can be damaging to the body. Fasting is not a method of punishing our bodies and it is not be used as a "dieting method" either. We are not to spend time in prayer and fasting in order to lose weight, but rather to gain a deeper fellowship with God.
Alternative medicine A period of voluntary abstinence from foods and/or drinks; fasting is integral to many religions, as it is believed to purify the mind and spirit; fasting rests the GI tract, and may rid the body of toxins and undigested metabolites; fasting leads to a loss of water, Na+, and K+, resulting in postural hypotension, and decreased blood sugar resulting in depression, fatigue, decreased libido, and malaise, increased nitrogen in the circulation due to protein breakdown, and may result in premature childbirth—Yom Kippur effect
Lowers insulin levels: Intermittent fasting acts on insulin in two ways. First, it boosts your adiponectin levels, which helps restore insulin sensitivity to prevent weight gain and diabetes. Second, fasting decreases your fasting insulin levels. Lowered insulin is the cue your body needs to make the switch to burning stored fat instead of glucose.[7]
Often when we slip up on a fast, we can let ourselves feel condemned and defeated. Breaking your fast in NOT a sin. If anything, you’ve proven your humanity, and 2 Corinthians 12:9 states that, “My strength is made perfect in weakness” (NKJV). God’s strength often shows up in our weakest moments. Don’t let a momentary lapse define your fast. We’re not pushing towards our stomach, we’re not even pushing to ourselves, but we are pushing to be closer to God.
Intermittent fasting, unlike many other diets, is famously flexible in that you choose the days and hours during which you think it’s best to fast. The two most common methods are the 16:8 strategy—where you eat whatever you want (within reason) for eight hours a day and then fast for the other 16—and the 5:2 method, where you eat normally five days a week and then keep your food intake to roughly 500-600 calories for the other two days. It’s kind of a simplified-calories math problem that’s supposed to prevent the yo-yo effect of weight loss and weight gain.
In the Bahá'í Faith, fasting is observed from sunrise to sunset during the Bahá'í month of 'Ala' ( 1 or 2 March – 19 or 20 March).[22] Bahá'u'lláh established the guidelines in the Kitáb-i-Aqdas. It is the complete abstaining from both food and drink during daylight hours (including abstaining from smoking). Consumption of prescribed medications is not restricted. Observing the fast is an individual obligation and is binding on Bahá'ís between 15 years (considered the age of maturity) and 70 years old.[22] Exceptions to fasting include individuals younger than 15 or older than 70; those suffering illness; women who are pregnant, nursing, or menstruating; travellers who meet specific criteria; individuals whose profession involves heavy labor and those who are very sick, where fasting would be considered dangerous. For those involved in heavy labor, they are advised to eat in private and generally to have simpler or smaller meals than are normal.
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