Several animal studies demonstrated that intermittent fasting based on daily circadian rhythms prevents weight gain. Mice given unlimited access to high-fat lab chow ate throughout the day and night which resulted in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Other mice fasted for 16 hours and actually consumed the same amount yet they didn’t gain weight or have negative health consequences. The findings suggest that it was the timing of eating, rather than the amount consumed which determined weight gain.
Another big concern of mine, but it turns out this fear was unfounded. We’ve been told by the supplement industry that we need to consume 30 g of protein every few hours, as that’s the most amount of protein our body can process at a time. Along with that, we’ve been told that if we don’t eat protein every few hours, our body’s muscle will start to break down to be burned as energy.
That means there’s certainly a type of person who won’t fare as well on it. “If you’re the type of person who wakes up ravenous, who loves breakfast, or who loves to snack, this may not be a good diet for you,” says Tinsley. “You won’t want to do something that makes it hard for you to adhere to. If this doesn’t gel with something you enjoy, you don’t need to fit yourself into this box just because intermittent fasting is popular right now.”
Fasting is the willing abstinence or reduction from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. An absolute fast or dry fasting is normally defined as abstinence from all food and liquid for a defined period. Water fasting refers to abstinence from all food and drink except water, but black coffee and tea may be consumed. Other fasts may be partially restrictive, limiting only particular foods or substances, or be intermittent.
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