Just began this 16:8 IF with Keto. I track macros and split them into two meals for my eating window. It works out to 40grams of protein each meal.. Isn’t this a lot of protein in one meal? Should I do less than my macros say because it’s two meals instead of three? Just checking because I thought I read somewhere about not consuming too much protein in a meal. Thank you.
^ Jump up to: a b Hatch, Jane M. (1978). The American Book of Days. Wilson. p. 163. ISBN 9780824205935. Special religious services are held on Ash Wednesday by the Church of England, and in the United States by Episcopal, Lutheran, and some other Protestant churches. The Episcopal Church prescribes no rules concerning fasting on Ash Wednesday, which is carried out according to members' personal wishes; however, it recommends a measure of fasting and abstinence as a suitable means of marking the day with proper devotion. Among Lutherans as well, there are no set rules for fasting, although some local congregations may advocate this form of penitence in varying degrees.
When you fast, be sure your devotion is to God. It is not necessary to tell the whole world what you are doing. If your fast is for man's praise and not God's approval, then your fast is in vain. Matthew 6:16-17 says, "When you fast, do not look somber as the hypocrites do, for they disfigure their faces to show men they are fasting. I tell you the truth, they have received their reward in full. But when you fast, put oil on your head and wash your face, so that it will not be obvious to men that you are fasting, but only to your Father, who is unseen; and your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you."
In section 109, of the same book, Yudhishthira asks Bheesma "what is the highest, most beneficial" and fruitful "of all kinds of fasts in the world". Bheeshma says "fasting on the 12th day of the lunar month" and worship Krishna, for the whole year. Krishna is worshipped in twelve forms as Kesava, Narayana, Madhava, Govinda, Vishnu, the slayer of Madhu, who covered the universe in three steps, the dwarf (who beguiled Mahabali), Sridhara, Hrishikesha, Padmanabha, Damodara, Pundhariksha. and Upendra. After fasting, one must feed a number of brahmans. Bheeshma says " the illustrious Vishnu, that ancient being, has himself said that there is no fast that possesses merit superior to what attach to fast of this kind." [84]
There is no long-term fasting research yet, but the benefits are promising and the risks low: You can always just quit. A limited-time fast might bump you off a plateau or out of a rut, says Keri Glassman, R.D., who advised our fasters during their diets, though she says that for some, fasting, even short-term, may be too rigid. That hints at the larger takeaway: Perhaps more than for traditional diets, these plans won't work for everyone.
Fasting for God is not always easy, but once started is extremely refreshing. The first day of any fast is the hardest. The body isn't usually happy when food is withheld. But if you are fasting for God with a purpose, each day that goes by is filled with hopeful anticipation for what God is doing because of your fast. Fast for God with purpose and intent. It will strengthen your entire resolve.
Fasting is practiced by lay Buddhists during times of intensive meditation, such as during a retreat. During periods of fasting, followers completely stray away from eating animal products although, they do allow consumption of milk. Furthermore, they also avoid eating processed foods and the five pungent foods which are; garlic, welsh onion, garlic chives, asana, leeks.[26] The Middle Path refers to avoiding extremes of indulgence on the one hand and self-mortification on the other. Prior to attaining Buddhahood, prince Siddhartha practiced a short regime of strict austerity and following years of serenity meditation under two teachers which he consumed very little food. These austerities with five other ascetics did not lead to progress in meditation, liberation (moksha), or the ultimate goal of nirvana. Henceforth, prince Siddhartha practiced moderation in eating which he later advocated for his disciples. However, on Uposatha days (roughly once a week) lay Buddhists are instructed to observe the eight precepts[27] which includes refraining from eating after noon until the following morning.[27] The eight precepts closely resemble the ten vinaya precepts for novice monks and nuns. The novice precepts are the same with an added prohibition against handling money.[28]

Wesley Duewel, a twentieth-century writer, said, “You and I have no more right to omit fasting because we feel no special emotional prompting than we have a right to omit prayer, Bible reading, or assembling with God’s children for lack of some special emotional prompting. Fasting is just as biblical and normal a part of a spiritual walk of obedience with God as are these others.”


Fasting is not a way to be forgiven of your sins, but rather a way to grow closer to God after he has already forgiven your sins. For your sins to be forgiven, cry out to God and ask him for forgiveness. Jesus (God) took the punishment for your sins - past present and future. Ask God to forgive you because of Jesus' sacrifice on the cross and realize you cannot save yourself by fasting or any other way. Only God can save you. Salvation is mercy. It is a free, undeserved gift of grace and love. Meditate on that and on the Bible. Read the book of John.

Studies on every-other-day fasting show mixed results. One published in 2010 in the Nutrition Journal suggested that the technique was effective among a group of obese patients. A group of 16 participants ate only one meal – lunch – every other day, and they were limited to about 500 calories. That's the same amount of calories women consume on the Fast Diet's fasting days. On the days when the study participants were not fasting, they were not constrained to any rules. Over the course of eight weeks, the participants lost an average of 12 3/10 pounds.
That’s what happened to me. I was in ketosis for a year, lost 125lbs, but then I started eating again and poof, back came 90 of the 125 pounds 🙁 I’m finding it more difficult to get back into the swing of eating under 20 carbs a day. I find myself starving, or carb starved as it’s called, and it’s proving to be difficult, even with the meal replacement drinks. I’m going to try this fasting and see if that will help me get back to skinny, but be able to keep it off.
7. Are you craving foods? Paying attention to your relationship with food during fasting is helpful to assess what’s working and what isn’t to build longer-term habits. For example, having a sweet tooth may be a major issue for you typically, but avoiding sugar and restricting calories may change things. Or maybe you notice you are craving greens or meat or another food. This may be from eliminating so many foods that the body is missing certain nutrients.
I am not against people fasting in order to lose weight. Many people fast to lose weight or maintain their weight.What I am opposed to is making the losing of weight your primary goal in a season of spiritual fasting and prayer. To have weight loss as a goal makes your fasting a diet plan, not a time of genuine fasting and prayer. If losing weight is your purpose in fasting, you will be missing out on the full reason for fasting, and you likely will be concerned only with what you don't eat rather than with what you are led to pray.
Many people who want to try IF choose the 16:8 method because it allows you to eat whatever you want for an 8-hour window and then fast for 16 hours. During the fasting period, you can drink water, tea, coffee, and even diet soda. The trick is to figure out what 8-hour eating window works best for you. Are you fine with skipping breakfast? Or do you work out in the morning and prefer to forgo dinner? Experiment with the eating and fasting intervals that work best for you. However, like all restrictive diets, there are some drawbacks. For one, drinking caffeinated drinks while fasting can disrupt your circadian rhythm, and therefore, your metabolism.
This is the same as the 8-to-6 window plan, but you are extending your fasting time an extra four hours. I personally practice this plan during the workweek. I'm not a breakfast person, so I just enjoy a few cups of herbal tea to start my day. With this plan you will be eating only between the hours of 12 p.m. and 6 p.m. for a full 18 hours of fasting within a 24-hour period.
How It Works: This one’s easy: Eat very little one day, and eat like normal the next. On the low-calorie days, that means one fifth of your normal calorie intake. Using 2,000 or 2,500 calories (for women and men, respectively) as a guide, “fasting” (or “down”) day should be 400 to 500 calories. Followers can use this tool to figure out how many calories to consume on “low-calorie” days.
Biblical fasting, unlike fasting for medical or health reasons, must be done with an attitude of seriousness and sincerity. When we fast, we willingly deprive the body of nourishment and the pleasurable taste of food. The body requires food for sustenance; therefore our hearts and minds must be totally focused and directed towards God so that He may be the full source of our strength during our period of fasting.
Intermittent fasting is the hottest dieting trend since keto. (Bonus points if you’re keto and intermittently fasting. You can probably fly now!) The gist is that people attempt to lose weight by only eating between certain hours, or they restrict their eating on certain days of the week while allowing themselves to eat normally the rest of the time. That’s the “intermittent” part: Eat regularly most of the time, restrict your eating other times. Then there’s a subset of intermittent fasting known as the 5:2 diet, in which people eat regularly five days of the week and take in a very restricted number of calories on two days.

It may sound really hard at first, but at least eight hours of the 16 is spent sleeping. There's also a lot of downtime between dinner and sleeping that adds up. Just be patient with yourself, and you'll find your body adjusting to this new eating schedule in no time. If you're looking to get started now, what better way than planning what you're going to eat during your eight-hour eating window?


When we fast and pray, God teaches us how to share with those who have physical and spiritual needs. “Is it not to share your food with the hungry and to provide the poor wanderer with shelter—when you see the naked, to clothe him, and not to turn away from your own flesh and blood?” (Isa. 58:7 NIV). The book of Proverbs complements this passage by reminding us that when we give to the poor, we lend to the Lord. Fasting and prayer put the self-life into perspective. You are never more like God than when you give. Prayer and fasting can build within you the character to give. Giving is a joy, and we need to be willing to pour ourselves out to those who can do nothing for us in life. We need to be willing to pour out ourselves to anyone, anytime, anywhere. This is the heart of Jesus, and it needs to be our heart. Prayer and fasting build within you the power to give.
In the Bahá'í Faith, fasting is observed from sunrise to sunset during the Bahá'í month of 'Ala' ( 1 or 2 March – 19 or 20 March).[22] Bahá'u'lláh established the guidelines in the Kitáb-i-Aqdas. It is the complete abstaining from both food and drink during daylight hours (including abstaining from smoking). Consumption of prescribed medications is not restricted. Observing the fast is an individual obligation and is binding on Bahá'ís between 15 years (considered the age of maturity) and 70 years old.[22] Exceptions to fasting include individuals younger than 15 or older than 70; those suffering illness; women who are pregnant, nursing, or menstruating; travellers who meet specific criteria; individuals whose profession involves heavy labor and those who are very sick, where fasting would be considered dangerous. For those involved in heavy labor, they are advised to eat in private and generally to have simpler or smaller meals than are normal.
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